QDMA and Powderhook Announce Deer Tracker Mobile App

ATHENS, GA (August 24, 2015) – QDMA and Powderhook are pleased to offer “Deer Tracker,” a free app that allows hunters to monitor deer activity and harvests in their neck of the woods and across the country. QDMA and Powderhook hope to use the data generated as part of a long-term research project aiming to improve the deer hunting experience for new hunters and experts alike.

Highlighted features of the app include a heat map optimized for daytime deer movement. Brian Murphy, CEO of QDMA, says it’s set up that way for an important reason.

“While hunting the rut gets the most attention, research confirms that the peak of the rut often is not the best time to harvest a deer,” said Murphy. “There are plenty of windows before and after the rut that can be good times to see deer moving. Thus, we set up our heat map to indicate the likelihood of a hunter seeing a mature deer during shooting light.”

Other features include observation and harvest reports, though the app makes it impossible to pinpoint the exact location of a single report. Powderhook CEO Eric Dinger said deer hunters will appreciate the ability to contribute to the overall improvement of deer hunting while not having to give up any of their personal information.

“As a deer hunter, the last thing I want to do is give someone the specific location of where I’m hunting. So, we don’t use pins, and our heat map blurs the user’s location by anywhere from 10 to 30 miles,” said Dinger.

Deer Tracker is a free app, thanks to partnership support from Cabela’s, Hunting Lease Network, SITKA Gear, and Bushnell. According to Dinger, each partner played an important role by contributing to the design of the app.

“Deer Tracker contains several hundred reporters we call Insiders, and these individuals are field employees and pro staff members of our partner brands,” said Dinger. “Their feedback and on-going participation in the app helped us get to where we are today, and Insiders will continue to add insightful reports people can rely on. Users of the app will notice the logo of the Insider’s affiliated company on the reports these individuals generate.”

While the app is free, users are able to upgrade the app for $2.99 to include Powderhook’s database of over 500,000 public hunting grounds.

“Hunters play the biggest role in conservation efforts across this country through purchasing licenses, firearms and ammunition,” said Lindsay Thomas Jr., QDMA Director of Communications. “These days, a hunter may only have limited time to prepare for and plan a hunt. We want to ensure they have the greatest opportunity for an enjoyable time in the woods, so they continue to carry on our hunting heritage.”

Deer Tracker is available for download through the Google Play and Apple App stores and can be accessed without the app via www.deertrackerapp.com on desktop devices.

About Powderhook

Powderhook’s mission is Access for All. That means access for new hunters, anglers and shooters; for parents and their children; for neighbors who haven’t been out in the field for years; and for you. Powderhook works with the nation’s leading conservation organizations, retailers and manufacturers. The Powderhook platform is bringing our industry together to solve some of its most important problems.

Top 8 Reasons to Lease Your Land for Hunting

Leasing your land is a balancing act of risk and reward for most landowners. Sure, you can make some extra money, but between finding the right group, covering any liability, and figuring out who’s doing what on your property it can be a bit of a hassle. Here some of the hidden benefits of leasing your land for hunting.

1) After setup, it’s almost completely passive income

2) Your lessees are likely to become family friends

3) Most people are happy to share their game with their landowners – ask for jerky and backstraps!

4) It’s not out of the question to ask your lessees for help with the things you need done, whether that’s spraying thistles, trimming trees or throwing bales

5) Having your ground leased cuts down on trespassers because you’ll have extra eyes and ears who care about your property

6) It’s your ground so it’s your rules, most hunters are happy to abide by your wishes, no matter what you have in mind

7) Your hunters will not only help you manage game populations on your property, but money from their licenses and gear funds nearly 80% of all conservation efforts in the United States

8) If you don’t hunt, they’d love to teach you, your kids, your grandkids, friends or pretty much anyone else to love and appreciate the outdoors

Lastly, if you are about the access problem, and that’s a strong possibility if you’re a fan of Powderhook, here are a couple things to keep in mind. 1) Traditional leasing can lock up your property such that only a few people can hunt it, thus consider allowing your lessee to sub-lease it to people you both approve during times or seasons they’re not using it. 2) Remember that many states have programs for leasing your land directly to your local fish and wildlife agency for the purpose of opening your land up to public hunting.

If you have any questions regarding leasing, or other forms of access, please don’t hesitate to reach out via the form found here: www.powderhook.com/lease

I Love You Enough to Teach You to Fish

According to the experts at World Bank​, the planet needs to produce 50% more food than we do today in order to feed the 9 billion people who’ll live here by 2050.

How can that possibly happen? Increases in efficiency are part of the answer. Lower food quality and artificial dietary supplements are, too. But the only real answer is our planet needs to build more farms, ranches and orchards.

Where will that happen? Drive out in the country sometime, or imagine for a minute your last trip. Do you see places where there could be farms, but instead native grasses or trees are growing? Now envision a similar dynamic in every country on every continent. Picture a growing quantity of agriculture and a declining quantity of truly wild places. In order to build a new farm, is there any option but to plow up a wild place?

See, hunting and fishing are about so much more than an angry tweet over the life of a lion. Hunting and fishing play a very serious role in the real-world conservation that sustains nearly all species of plant and animal on Earth. All people are in a lifelong dogfight to preserve all of creation – the left and right, the greenies and oil barons, the anti and pro-hunters – we’re all bound to this watery rock and can only take from it so much before we endanger the plants and animals in our way.

If you don’t hunt or fish because you love animals or don’t want to see them killed, you are holding on to an ideal that is some parts fantasy and all parts unsustainable. Something will die today so that you can live. Whether you kill it or someone else does it for you, it must die for you to live.

When we plow up native grass to plant corn, when we cut down trees to build strip malls, we are removing the only home a wild animal has. And, once it’s gone, we’ll almost never get it back. When a person buys a fishing license, a hunting license, or pays a premium for the life of a living thing via some exotic hunt, they are actively preserving the wild places that sustain the animals we all love. Humans have developed no other model that works at scale. If you love animals you must support direct participation in the food chain via hunting or fishing, or you must take responsibility for your role as the surrogate killer, the politically correct accomplice in the true crime against wild animals and places.

About the author:

Eric Dinger is the co-founder and CEO of Powderhook.com, a website built to help people find access to hunting and fishing spots, trips, groups and events. He can be reached at eric@powderhook.com.

Cecil the Lion Would Want You to Hunt

Take a couple minutes to watch this video.

http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/sportsmens-alliance-ceo-talks-economy-of-hunting-conservation/

Nick Pinizzotto, CEO of the US Sportsmen’s Alliance, has been making the rounds. Once again thrust into the spotlight following a period of white-hot internet outrage, Nick is a thoughtful leader in a time when the lines between social media sensationalism and what we used to call journalism seem blurry. Please watch and share his interview on CBS This Morning. Powderhook commends CBS for seeking answers, rather than simply clicks.

The fact is, only the people involved know what happened in Zimbabwe. If things played out the way they have been reported, no one will be harder on the alleged perpetrators than the hunting community. But, if we find out they didn’t, who will help the dentist, his family, his employees and their families pick up the mess our outrage culture has created?

Not one person we’ve met during our time in the hunting industry believes in killing wild animals for “sport.” Hunting lions in Africa is not something most hunters would do, but it’s also not something most people are qualified to judge. The way the system of wildlife conservation – and the conservation of a lot of things we collectively value – works requires the animal to have a value. Not value given by God, but a value driven by human consumption. Such is the hand of the apex omnivore. Without that economic value, wild places must be plowed up in favor of crop fields or strip malls in order to support the people who inhabit them. Or, they must be left alone and supported by some other means, such as hunting license sales, taxes or easements. As the middle class expands throughout the world, and our consumerism-driven population grows, this problem will only get worse.

Our solution: offer to take someone hunting or fishing with you. When they buy their license, teach them how that money is used for conservation – to buy and preserve the land that doesn’t grow the food they eat, but rather the land and water where our precious wild things live.

Cecil, Jericho and all other wild animals, even those without names, need wild places to survive. Until there is another viable model of conservation and management, Cecil would want you to hunt.

About the author:

Eric Dinger is the co-founder and CEO of Powderhook.com, a website built to help people find access to hunting and fishing spots, trips, groups and events. He can be reached at eric@powderhook.com.