Tag Archives: Powderhook

Major Powderhook Update

Powderhook Launches Major App Update

LINCOLN, NE  Local, current information on hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting is now easier than ever to find with the newest Powderhook update. The Nebraska-based tech company has assembled nearly 10,000 outdoor events from many major NGO’s, retailers, state agencies and more and organized them in a new feature called “Discover.”

Here’s a breakdown of everything you’ll find in the newest release. As always, visit the App Store or Google Play to download or update the app.

Discover: Easily find an event or public hunting spot near you.

Events
When people are out looking for stuff to do on the weekends, outdoor events usually aren’t on anyone’s radar. Why is that? People who host outdoor events are competing for attendees just like a movie theater, concert venue, sporting event or pretty much anything that a person can do to entertain themselves. This update and the API Powderhook has created for others to use changes that.

When it comes to creating new participants, it’s hard to know which event might trip which trigger. With the Powderhook update, we’ve not only begun to distribute our partner’s events to the top five event hosting websites on the internet, we compile them in a sortable feed for our users to access.

Public Spots
People are constantly looking for a new or better spot to go. Powderhook has always had one of the most complete public lands map available for free to anyone who downloads, but now we give users a cleaner ability to sort and configure search results. “I was headed up to Ohio last weekend and used the app to find a spot to go,” says app user Bobby Bostian. “It was great being able to hit the ‘Directions’ button and have it take me right to the spot. I also showed a couple hunters the ‘Discover’ section of the app and they were absolutely amazed at all of the public land that was available in their area.”

Leaderboards: Find out who’s doing the work of passing along our heritage in your state.

Whenever a user in the app answers a question, makes a post, replies to a comment, or becomes a Digital Mentor they earn what we call “CRED”. The more a person uses the app and provides useful information, the more they can build their “CRED,” one day earning them incentives. People can now see how they stack up to other users in their state to provide a fun, competitive aspect to helping others have a better day outdoors.

Student Externship Opportunity

Powderhook, an innovative hunting and fishing tech company, is looking for top-performing, ambitious and self-starting college students who love to hunt, fish and get outdoors – and want to get real-world marketing, business experience, and learn more about the outdoor industry. As an extern, you will share your outdoor experience and expertise and interact with others to help to introduce people to the active outdoor lifestyle we love and enjoy and, in doing so, help Powderhook grow.

Powderhook externs will be part of a college-based network of externs who will promote, largely through social-media interaction, the Powderhook app and participate in marketing and other events to raise awareness about the app while promoting hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation.

About Powderhook:

Powderhook is a cutting-edge hunting and fishing tech company dedicated to helping people have better outdoor experiences, through an app that connects outdoor enthusiasts of all walks of life and experience levels. Through Powderhook, outdoorsmen and women can communicate with fellow outdoorsmen and women and ask how-to, where-to, or any other type of questions.

Whether someone is new to the outdoors or an experienced hunter, they can ask their outdoor-related questions on the app and someone in their area or the area they are asking about will help get them on the right track. Are fishing biting on Lake So-and-So; are ducks showing up from the north yet; is ABC Public Hunting Area full of deer; what’s the best bait for crappie in your area; are spring gobblers still henned up – those are the type of questions streaming into the Powderhook App seeking help and advice from local experts.

As a Powderhook extern you will:

  • Be Part of an Innovative New Program
    • You will have different opportunities and experiences that will help you prepare for your career. These marketing and business opportunities will allow externs to gain experience, learn new things and sharpen skills.
    • You will be able to earn caps, T-shirts, hunting, fishing and shooting gear and other swag based on the level of your participation and success.
  • Be Given a Powderhook Pro Account
    • With this account you will be able to create a custom banner to post events and create personal content within the Powderhook app. Users have to pay for Pro accounts but externs will get access for free. This can be a key tool in marketing efforts, increasing your interactions – and your chance to earn additional gear and prizes.
  • Have Your Ideas Implemented
    • Powderhook encourages you to provide feedback on our app. Your ideas could be implemented into the app. Creativity pays off. This is a chance to be on the leading edge of, and participate in, outdoor-marketing technology.
  • Get Involved in Real-World Learning Experiences,
    • You will have the opportunity to participate in webinars, phone conferences, and speeches from the leaders in the outdoor industry. You’ll have a chance to learn from the top experts and company leaders across the outdoor spectrum.
  • Start Your Own Marketing Campaigns
    • Being innovative will make you stand out. You will be able to build your own marketing campaign like hosting events, posting on social media and pitching stories to the media to help market Powderhook. The more you put into your marketing efforts, the more you will get out of it. Imagine the resume-building potential of having your ideas as part of a national marketing campaign.
  • Learn From Powderhook’s CEO
    • You will have the chance to participate in Q&A’s with our CEO on many different topics ranging from starting a business to hunting and fishing. Be forewarned, he likes a good hunting or fishing story, whether he’s telling them or you are.
  • Have the Opportunity to Write
    • Your stories about your outdoor adventures may be published on Powderhook’s blog and your outdoor videos may be distributed on all our social media platforms as well as our blog.
  • Have the Ability to Publish Articles
    • You will have the opportunity to create content for our newsletter, which is distributed to all our app users
  • Have the Ability to Grow
    • You will have the ability to advance your role within the externship program. As the program matures, there will be opportunities to grow and advance into a higher role.

Extern Expectations:

As an ambassador of Powderhook, you will interact with other hunters, anglers and outdoors people as the face of the brand. You will be an extension of Powderhook, a person-to-person link between the brand and outdoor users. Keep that in mind as you try to be the best extern you can be.

It’s simple. We want you to share your outdoor experience, expertise, photos, videos, stories and anything else related to the outdoors.

For starters, we want you to:

  • Share photos and information about the brand on your social media, doing so in a natural way.
  • Interact with others who are asking questions about Powderhook, or posting in the Powderhook app. It’ll give you a chance to answer questions posted on Powderhook or interact with others to find answers.
  • Take the Outdoor Pledge. Powderhook seeks to unite individuals and groups that care about the true meaning of hunting and fishing. By taking the pledge you are committed to being a steward of the land, promoting goodwill through strong ethics, honoring the beauty and fragility of nature, acting lawfully and respectfully, and teaching the next generation to do the same.
  • Recruit other ambassadors. We want the Powderhook Externship program to spread to campuses across the nation. You can help by introducing friends, acquaintances or hunting and fishing buddies at other colleges.

Extern Objectives:

As part of Powderhook’s Externship Program, your objectives will be to market Powderhook any way you think will reach the most potential users effectively. The main objectives are getting people to download the app, app interactions, increasing brand awareness, and developing content within the app.

  • Use marketing tools
    • Social media platforms
    • Creating marketing campaigns
    • Creating your own marketing idea
  • Increase Brand Awareness
    • Host events that Powderhook will sponsor to help promote brand awareness
    • Attend events on campus and talk about Powderhook and our mission
  • Get New Users to Download the App
    • Use your creative marketing ideas and resources to market to potential users
  • Creating Content
    • Your content will come from:
      • Being an active user in the app, asking questions, answering questions, posting reports of your outdoor activities
    • Writing stories to post on Powderhook’s blog
    • Helping create newsletter articles
  • Goals for Externs
    • Earning swag by surpassing milestones of the number of people downloading the app
    • Increasing your cred in the app. Cred is a scale that tells us how much a user- is posting, commenting, and liking posts in the app. The more posts, comments and likes earned by the extern, the more cred.
    • Regularly posting on social media platforms.
  • Extern Challenges:
    • Challenges will be held throughout the externship. We will have campus vs. campus challenges as well as intramural campus challenges. The goal of challenges is to bring out the competitive and creative side of each extern. Coming up with new and innovative ways to outperform your peers can make you a challenge winner and earn prizes.
  • What Else You Need to Know
    • As a part of Powderhook you will gain real-world working and learning experience you can proudly add to your resume. This is ideal for creative self-thinkers who are willing to think out-of-the-box and make things happen
    • Along with all of the access you will have being an extern, you will also be able to earn awesome swag from Powderhook and our partner companies.
    • Your experience with Powderhook will be what you make it but we will be here to guide you step-by-step to get started and help you do the best work – while giving you room to let your creative energies loose. In a nutshell, this program is a unique opportunity for anyone who is an avid outdoorsmen in college who wants to learn more about start-up businesses and gain experience in marketing. It’s a real resume builder. We want you to enjoy working with Powderhook and we will do everything we can to make your experience with the program as enjoyable and rewarding as possible.

 

To apply for the Powderhook Externship Program go to this link-> https://goo.gl/forms/xTn6SOXAjniweXxv2

If you have questions email, sam@powderhook.com

Hunter Finds A Bear Sitting In His Treestand

Expecting to spend some time in his treestand, this hunter was surprised to see a black bear had already claimed his stand for the day.

This video shows you can’t predict how wild animals are going to act and that you may have to adjust your hunt because you are in their habitat. This black bear got a lecture on what his role is supposed to be in the woods.

Watch this video as the hunter tries to reason with the bear that took over his treestand.

Video by  Jim Burnworth

 

Let’s say we completely ban guns

Our country has a huge problem. Mass killings are disgusting and we need to investigate every possible solution to reversing what is a growing trend. According to some sources there have been over 300 mass killings in the last 300 days. In our great nation, innocent people should not be dying in their schools, movie theaters,  places of work or at their finish lines. That much is very simple and a fact on which we can all agree. It’s pathetic.


Let’s say we completely ban guns. Continue reading Let’s say we completely ban guns

WATERFOWL TRACKER: A NEW TOOL FOR HUNTERS

Just as duck seasons open around the country, a new tool for sharing information about the migration is ready to go.
Cabela’s and Powderhook are pleased to announce the launch of “Waterfowl Tracker,” a free app that allows hunters to monitor waterfowl migration activity and harvest reports in their neck of the woods, and up and down their flyway.

Highlighted features of the app include four heat maps optimized for waterfowl migration. Eric Dinger, CEO of Powderhook, says it’s set up that way for an important reason.

“Each waterfowl species migrates at a slightly different time,” said Dinger. “We engineered the app such that users can see a map specifically built for mallards, other ducks, dark geese and light geese. In time we believe users will really enjoy the ability to differentiate the snow goose migration from the Canada migration”

Other features include observation and harvest reports, though the app makes it impossible to pinpoint the exact location of a single report. Powderhook CEO Eric Dinger said waterfowl hunters will appreciate the ability to contribute to the overall improvement of waterfowl hunting while not having to give up any of their personal information.

“As a waterfowl hunter, the last thing I want to do is give someone the specific location of where I’m hunting. So, we don’t use pins, and our heat map blurs the user’s location by anywhere from 20 to 40 miles,” said Dinger.

Waterfowl Tracker is a free app, thanks to a partnership with Cabela’s. According to Dinger, the team at Cabela’s and many others throughout the country played an important role in contributing to the design of the app.

Waterfowl Tracker contains several hundred reporters we call Insiders, and these individuals are field employees and pro staff members of our partner brands,” said Dinger. “Their feedback and on-going participation in the app helped us get to where we are today, and Insiders will continue to add insightful reports people can rely on. Users of the app will notice the logo of the Insider’s affiliated company on the reports these individuals generate.”

While the app is free, users are able to upgrade the app for $2.99 to include Powderhook’s database of over 650,000 public hunting grounds. Additional features available via the upgrade include the ability zoom as far as possible and several others to be announced in the coming weeks.

“Hunters play the biggest role in conservation efforts across this country through purchasing licenses, firearms and ammunition,” said Dinger. “These days, a hunter may only have limited time to prepare for and plan a hunt. We want to ensure they have the greatest opportunity for an enjoyable time outdoors, so they continue to carry on our hunting heritage.”

Waterfowl Tracker is available for download through the Google Play and Apple App stores and can be accessed without the app via www.waterfowltracker.com on desktop devices.

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Species specific heat maps. Pins for your reports, no pins for the reports made by other people.

heatmap

Timeline view of reports near you, or near any area you want to research.
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Weather, wind, pressure and other data is automatically appended to reports based on the time and location of the report.
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Guys, Take Your Little Girls Hunting

By Eric Dinger, co-founder of Powderhook

Life with three kids and a new business can be pretty busy. So, you can imagine my excitement when I found yesterday there was nothing on the family calendar and I was going to be able to leave work in time to make it out to my favorite dove hunting spot. Time to take advantage of one of the best parts of living in a place like Lincoln; you’re never more than 15 minutes from a dirt road!

As I worked my way through the day, a thought hit me. Today would be the perfect day to take Reagan, my four year-old daughter, on her first hunt! The weather was right, there wasn’t going to be a big group and she didn’t have any plans.

I’m always excited to get outdoors, something I think I come by naturally. In fact, almost every year my Dad says something to me along the lines of, “I’m 54… 5… 6… years old, and I’m still as excited to go hunting as I was when I was a kid.” Having now hunted for the first time with Reagan, I’m witness to a new level of excitement. Maybe that was the simple joy of a little girl and her Daddy spending time doing something together. But, I think there was more to it. Here’s a glimpse into our evening together. I hope you’ll use it as a reason to take the young people in your life out with you next time you go.

First things first. Mom needed a picture. Check.
First things first. Mom needed a picture. Check.
Next, we had to make our ceremonial stop at the gas station. Is it even possible to start a hunting trip without it?
Next, we had to make our ceremonial stop at the gas station. Is it even possible to start a hunting trip without it?
Jackpot! A spinny airplane candy dealy bobber with some Hello Kitty juice. Nice work, Junk Food Marketers, you win this time.
Jackpot! A spinny airplane candy dealy bobber with some Hello Kitty juice. Nice work, Junk Food Marketers, you win this time.
On our way out to the spot we spotted some teal on the pond. Reagan used her
On our way out to the spot we found some teal on the pond. Reagan used her “binocliers” to “make them look huge.” Right at about this point I realized how awesome this night might get.
We caught grasshoppers and butterflies until the doves started to fly overhead. Watching her trample fearlessly through the grass made me realize that we teach our little girls to be afraid of things like bugs. They aren't naturally all that caught up in how
We caught grasshoppers and butterflies until the doves started to fly overhead. Watching her trample fearlessly through the grass made me realize that we teach our little girls to be afraid of things like bugs. They aren’t naturally all that caught-up in how “yucky” things are. Note to self: Don’t teach her to be afraid of singing in public, dancing her butt off at weddings, speaking her mind, or talking in front of groups of people, either.
We had a little safety lesson. She learned never to play with real guns, to never ever point a gun at people, even the fake ones, and she learned that guns are safe if we're safe with them and they're dangerous if we don't follow the rules. She said,
We had a little safety lesson. She learned never to play with real guns and to never ever point a gun at people, even the fake ones. And, she learned that guns are safe if we’re safe with them and they’re dangerous if we don’t follow the rules. She said, “okay, Dad” as if depositing those little morsels into her long-term memory bank.
Next, I got to learn about all kinds of important things. Like, how bugs probably don't like candy and how Mom doesn't always need flowers, but we might need to pick her some anyways.
Next, I got to learn about all kinds of important things. Like, how bugs probably don’t like candy and how Mom doesn’t always need flowers, but we might need to pick her some anyways.
As the shadows got long, the doves started flying. She was ready.
As the shadows got long, the doves started flying. She was ready.
When the first dove hit the ground, she took off after it. It will never cease to amaze me how a little girl who wears Disney Princess gear 24x7 can toss on her jeans and mix it up with the best of them. With no hesitation, she grabbed the dove by the foot and proudly showed me she wasn't afraid. It was then that she noticed the blood. I feared for this moment, because I knew she would ask.
When the first dove hit the ground, she took off after it. It will never cease to amaze me how a little girl who wears Disney Princess gear 24×7 can toss on her jeans and mix it up with the best of them. With no hesitation, she grabbed the dove by the foot and proudly showed me she wasn’t afraid. It was then that she noticed the blood. I feared this moment, because I knew she would ask. “What’s wrong with his head… does he have a headache?” Ready, I answered, “no, honey, he’s dead.” In stride, she said, “well then we’ll take him home and we can eat him, right?” Right. We’d talked about this topic many times while fishing, but she had already made the correlation to hunting. The things we eat were once alive. They have to die in order for us to live. Simple, I guess.
It's hard for me to think of a time when she was happier to be with me. Not only was it the one-on-one time all little kids love, but I think she was genuinely interested in learning about hunting. She told me I was just like her teacher. That's high praise from a pre-schooler.
It’s hard for me to think of a time when she was happier to be with me. Not only was it the one-on-one time all little kids love, but I think she was genuinely interested in learning about hunting. She told me I was just like her teacher. That’s high praise from a pre-schooler.
From her frenzied 25-minute recounting of the story to her Mom on the phone to the unbridled joy on her face, she had made my night so special.
From her frenzied 25-minute recounting of the story to her Mom on the phone to the unbridled joy on her face, she had made my night so special.

QDMA and Powderhook Announce Deer Tracker Mobile App

ATHENS, GA (August 24, 2015) – QDMA and Powderhook are pleased to offer “Deer Tracker,” a free app that allows hunters to monitor deer activity and harvests in their neck of the woods and across the country. QDMA and Powderhook hope to use the data generated as part of a long-term research project aiming to improve the deer hunting experience for new hunters and experts alike.

Highlighted features of the app include a heat map optimized for daytime deer movement. Brian Murphy, CEO of QDMA, says it’s set up that way for an important reason.

“While hunting the rut gets the most attention, research confirms that the peak of the rut often is not the best time to harvest a deer,” said Murphy. “There are plenty of windows before and after the rut that can be good times to see deer moving. Thus, we set up our heat map to indicate the likelihood of a hunter seeing a mature deer during shooting light.”

Other features include observation and harvest reports, though the app makes it impossible to pinpoint the exact location of a single report. Powderhook CEO Eric Dinger said deer hunters will appreciate the ability to contribute to the overall improvement of deer hunting while not having to give up any of their personal information.

“As a deer hunter, the last thing I want to do is give someone the specific location of where I’m hunting. So, we don’t use pins, and our heat map blurs the user’s location by anywhere from 10 to 30 miles,” said Dinger.

Deer Tracker is a free app, thanks to partnership support from Cabela’s, Hunting Lease Network, SITKA Gear, and Bushnell. According to Dinger, each partner played an important role by contributing to the design of the app.

“Deer Tracker contains several hundred reporters we call Insiders, and these individuals are field employees and pro staff members of our partner brands,” said Dinger. “Their feedback and on-going participation in the app helped us get to where we are today, and Insiders will continue to add insightful reports people can rely on. Users of the app will notice the logo of the Insider’s affiliated company on the reports these individuals generate.”

While the app is free, users are able to upgrade the app for $2.99 to include Powderhook’s database of over 500,000 public hunting grounds.

“Hunters play the biggest role in conservation efforts across this country through purchasing licenses, firearms and ammunition,” said Lindsay Thomas Jr., QDMA Director of Communications. “These days, a hunter may only have limited time to prepare for and plan a hunt. We want to ensure they have the greatest opportunity for an enjoyable time in the woods, so they continue to carry on our hunting heritage.”

Deer Tracker is available for download through the Google Play and Apple App stores and can be accessed without the app via www.deertrackerapp.com on desktop devices.

About Powderhook

Powderhook’s mission is Access for All. That means access for new hunters, anglers and shooters; for parents and their children; for neighbors who haven’t been out in the field for years; and for you. Powderhook works with the nation’s leading conservation organizations, retailers and manufacturers. The Powderhook platform is bringing our industry together to solve some of its most important problems.

Top 8 Reasons to Lease Your Land for Hunting

Leasing your land is a balancing act of risk and reward for most landowners. Sure, you can make some extra money, but between finding the right group, covering any liability, and figuring out who’s doing what on your property it can be a bit of a hassle. Here some of the hidden benefits of leasing your land for hunting.

1) After setup, it’s almost completely passive income

2) Your lessees are likely to become family friends

3) Most people are happy to share their game with their landowners – ask for jerky and backstraps!

4) It’s not out of the question to ask your lessees for help with the things you need done, whether that’s spraying thistles, trimming trees or throwing bales

5) Having your ground leased cuts down on trespassers because you’ll have extra eyes and ears who care about your property

6) It’s your ground so it’s your rules, most hunters are happy to abide by your wishes, no matter what you have in mind

7) Your hunters will not only help you manage game populations on your property, but money from their licenses and gear funds nearly 80% of all conservation efforts in the United States

8) If you don’t hunt, they’d love to teach you, your kids, your grandkids, friends or pretty much anyone else to love and appreciate the outdoors

Lastly, if you are about the access problem, and that’s a strong possibility if you’re a fan of Powderhook, here are a couple things to keep in mind. 1) Traditional leasing can lock up your property such that only a few people can hunt it, thus consider allowing your lessee to sub-lease it to people you both approve during times or seasons they’re not using it. 2) Remember that many states have programs for leasing your land directly to your local fish and wildlife agency for the purpose of opening your land up to public hunting.

If you have any questions regarding leasing, or other forms of access, please don’t hesitate to reach out via the form found here: www.powderhook.com/lease

Want to change a generation? Feed your kids fish they catch.

In his timeless 1949 classic, A Sand County Almanac, Aldo Leopold famously wrote, “There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.” I have a very real fear for my kids – the danger Leopold prophesied over 65 years ago.

My teenage daughter is a pretty normal 16-year-old kid. At any moment she’s a monster cookie of sweet and salty, wit and sarcasm, delightfulness and delinquency. Monster cookies are wonderful, if not unpredictable. But, this cookie comes with one constant: her phone. My goodness, she loves her phone. It’s more than a communication device; it’s her hobby, her companion and her lifeline to the minute-by-minute updates she holds so dear.

Generational differences aside, her compulsion for connectedness worries me. Perhaps ironically, it’s my perception of her lack of connection to the tangible world around her that scares me. Much of how we perceive the world comes to us through the conditioning and learning we experience when we’re young. For people like me, those lessons were earned outside. My daughter and many of her friends, normal small town kids, largely view the outdoors as the mundane gap between their indoors – the stuff you drive through on the way to your hockey game. When I rode long distances as a kid, I would count the duck species I saw or try to figure out how many minutes it would take us to get to the next exit. Now, we flip on a movie and ride quietly as our kids stare blankly at one device or another. Gone are the hours of unstructured play, the exploration and outdoor discovery that defined my childhood, in favor of new forms of the same with names like Netflix, Spotify, and Instagram. Telling your teenager to go outside and play has become the equivalent of saying “go use your phone where I can’t see you.”

My desire isn’t that my kids grow up to be like me, but rather that they explore, think critically and problem solve. Can these foundations be learned via a screen? My daughter consumes almost every form of content she values via her phone. She need not be curious about the world around her because Google has answers. (with pictures!) Exploration looks a lot like Wikipedia. She knows beef comes from cows because that’s easy to read on Gawker. But, does she value the farm… the farmer… the cow itself? She’ll cry foul at the site of a feedlot, a judicious member of her outrage culture, but will she care enough to try to understand the complexity of raising enough beef to feed our developing world at a price point they can afford?

In my brief time as a parent, I’ve come across only one antidote. Feed your kids fish they catch. The whole process is importantly unscreened. It’s tough to fish with a phone in your hand. Still more difficult to avoid the beauty of a sunset from a quiet boat, the enormity and fragility of nature on full display. (Enter phone for #sunset pic.) Neither Instagram nor Google will tell you how to catch those pesky late-July walleye. After all, if you’re gonna be there you may as well catch a fish! Maybe a parent’s experience with #walleyeprobs can be the start of a richer conversation.

That something must die so you can live is a fundamental of our existence, yet ditching the supply chain in favor of active participation in the food chain can be an emotional experience. It’s complicated to watch a living thing make its way to your plate. The entire lake-to-table experience encapsulates Leopold’s wish for us – that we pay attention to the places and living things around us, and that we are thoughtful about our role as apex omnivores in a fragile ecosystem. As I strive to raise curious, critical-thinking problem solvers, the time we spend fishing has become the one screen through which I’m confident I can connect.

I believe deeper relationships with the world around us are key to the changes we hope to see in every generation. Whether you garden, fish, hunt or forage, take the time to include your kids and maybe you’ll both find that connection.

About the author:

Eric Dinger is the co-founder and CEO of Powderhook.

Powderhook is a software-as-a-service company with a unique business model engineered to crack the biggest problem facing the future of conservation: declining participation. Our free apps help people hunt, fish and shoot more often, and have better days when they go. We believe mentoring is marketing, and businesses like Cabela’s, National Wild Turkey Federation, and Arizona Game and Parks, buy our platform to help grow their businesses by engaging in the mentoring process. Using Powderhook technology, people get the local, current information they want, and brands get the customers they need.

To get the app visit: www.powderhook.com