Category Archives: Hunting

The Question That Will Save Hunting

It’s been well documented hunting license buyers are declining as a percentage of the US population. Beginning around age 65, license sales begin to plummet drastically, as hunters begin to have physical, financial, geographic, or other limitations. While the overall decline in total licenses sold has been very slow, the largest cohort of hunters, the Baby Boomers, are nearing the proverbial license buying “cliff.” Alarmingly, the cohort of Millennials who must replace them appears to be significantly smaller. Analyzing the data in the video below can lead one to some grim conclusions for our North American Model of Wildlife Conservation.

Video and Data Credit: Dr. Loren Chase, Arizona Game and Fish

 

Hundreds of entities including businesses, organizations, and agencies, as well as individuals in positions of leadership in the hunting industry have turned their focus to this very real threat. But can their concerted efforts do enough, fast enough?  No one knows, but what we do know is our industry needs the help of the individual sportsman and woman.

The one sure way we can change is to engage people at the local level in affecting this trend in their own lives. No single program, no marketing campaign, no app, or website can do what the readers of this story can do by stepping up and getting involved. It’s up to us as individual sportsmen and women to do the work.

So, here’s the big question: Do more people hunt because of you, or do fewer people hunt because of you? If everyone you hunt with, and everyone they hunt with could answer “more,” we will secure our collective hunting heritage long into the future.

Let’s start asking.

SCOTT RALL – POWDERHOOK LOCAL LEGEND

Scott Rall is an avid hunting enthusiast. He loves to run his black labs pheasant hunting while inviting youth, woman, wounded warriors to hunt right along with him. Scott enjoys helping with Minnesota’s Governors’ hunt, and teaching youth gun safety. But that’s just scratching the surface of his contribution to the future of hunting.

Along with getting a local high school trap team established, Scott and his partners have played a huge role in the local Pheasants Forever chapter which was noted as one of the top chapters in the US. His most notable contribution to land management was the purchase of an $852,000 147-acre parcel of land that they have had their eye on for 20 years. When the land went up for sale, Scott only had three and a half weeks to put together enough partners to reach the $852,000 price tag. This land will be held as a Wildlife Management Area available to the public to hunt for years to come.

If someone in your area is doing what it takes to be called a Local Legend, shoot Powderhook an email at legends@powderhook.com. Please include some contact info, along with a photo, and a few sentences on why you believe your nominee deserves recognition for their work.

Remington Model 700 and Model Seven Recall Notice

 

 

Remington has voluntarily recalled the Remington Model 700 and Model Seven rifles with the XMP triggers, rifles manufactured from May 1, 2006, to April 9, 2014, are subject to this recall. There is a concern that under certain circumstances the rifles could unintentionally discharge. Remington is notifying the public about this recall for consumer safety. Remington investigated this problem and determined that some of the XMP triggers might have excess bonding agent used in the assembly process.

Click here to determine if your rifle is subject to this recall.

Video: Two Bucks Locked Together Attacked By Coyotes

 

Nature is a wild and dangerous place. This video shows how two deer in the wild have an obstacle they have to overcome and find ways to survive.

Two bucks were fighting and became locked together. They frantically tried to free themselves from their life-threatening antler lock. Coyotes noticed the two bucks in distress and came to the scene and thought that they were going to get an easy meal. The Bucks were able to fend off those coyotes. This attack won’t be the only attack or obstacle that these two bucks will face while they are locked together.

Byron Haldiman’s parents videoed this intense encounter between the bucks and coyotes. He said that “9 days later the deer were seen on the farm again still locked together and drinking from the creek.” Byron attempted to free the deer from each other but could not get close enough to help. The way that the buck’s antlers got locked together was on the side allowing them to “travel almost as well as a single animal.”

8 Things Non-Hunters Are Missing Out On

If you’re at all familiar with our work here at Powderhook, you know we love hunting. But, we loved hunting long before there was a Powderhook, and will love it for decades to come. Most people have something they’re passionate about, but being passionate about hunting offers benefits far beyond what can be simply described. That’s why we believe one needs to hunt in order to understand hunting and hunters. For non-hunters, this simply means they can’t feel what we’ve felt, and it bums me out for them. Here’s what I think they’re missing.


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Watching the sun come up over the Bighorn Mountains while glassing for elk. Photo Credit: Martin Hogan

1: Witnessing the Forest Coming to Life

I really cannot explain it any better than movie star Chris Pratt did in this interview. “You walk out in the woods and the sun hasn’t come up yet, and you sit in a spot and your preparation has told you that this is the right spot. And the sun comes up and you are camouflaged, nothing knows you’re there, nothing can smell you, the wind is in your face. You’re a voyeur to the world waking up and the wilderness waking up around you in a way that no one gets to see it, when they drive their car down the road, because they’ve disturbed it. You’ve snuck in. If a tree fell in the woods and didn’t make a sound you’d be there to witness it, because nobody is there, you are not even there. And then the sun comes up and the last stars in the sky go away and the whole world comes to life.” Continue reading 8 Things Non-Hunters Are Missing Out On

5 Things Hunters Can Learn from the World Series

An all time classic. Game 7 ended about 8 hours ago. In a stroke of genius, or terrible parenting, I woke up my kids (ages 3 and 5) to tell them – on the off chance they’ll remember the night back in 2016 the Cubs won the World Series. I’ve been a Cubs fan since I was a little boy watching Ryno Sandberg on WGN in South Dakota.  They were always my second favorite team behind the Twins until my best buddy moved out to Chicago for college and we caught our first game at Wrigley.

I know what you’re thinking… sweet story dude, but why the heck does this matter in a story about hunting? Continue reading 5 Things Hunters Can Learn from the World Series

A Father-Son Elk Hunt

This is the story of my Rocky Mountain Elk hunt in the White River National Forest of Colorado. I’ll remember this trip forever, not just because it was with my Dad, but because of the way I felt when all was said and done.

By Eric Dinger

It was a normal June day at the office when I received a call from my friend, Josh Dahlke, the man behind the Scoutlook app, and host of the internet show The Hunger. Josh had booked a Colorado elk hunt and two of his four guys had backed out. He asked if I’d like to come along and bring a friend.

I don’t have a long bucket list, since I pretty much want to go everywhere and do everything, but hunting elk with my Dad had long been the one thing I could name. I’d always claimed I wanted to do so with my bow, but I was happy the opportunity had finally come. Given the hunt was to be largely a public land endeavor and the price to stay in the small private cabin adjoining the White River National Forest near Buford, Colorado was really palatable, I jumped at the chance. Getting my Dad to come along wasn’t hard, though he would have to leave for a week in the middle of harvest. For an ag man, that’s certainly not ideal timing. A bucket goes dry if the man carrying it waits for that mythical time. Continue reading A Father-Son Elk Hunt

10 Things You Can Do to Ensure the Future of Hunting

We live in an extremely fluid world where public perceptions and opinions on issues can change by the hour.

Just because hunting has been around for 90 percent of human history doesn’t mean that it will be around for the next 50 years. We cannot take our rights for granted. Preaching to the choir will not save hunting; we must influence others outside our circle to further our message.

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If we want to preserve the proud traditions of hunting for future generations, we must expose and mentor those generations to the most basic of human behaviors. Here are a few places to start.

1. Become a Hunting Mentor
Though I spent lots of time at the shooting range as a kid, I grew up without exposure to hunting because there was no one to take me out and teach me the ropes. Not every child has a parent who hunts or has the time to be a good mentor.

Whether you mentor your own children or grandchildren, nieces or nephews, or just a family friend or neighbor, you can do your part in passing along your knowledge and enthusiasm to another generation of hunters. Taking someone hunting just once could be life-changing for that individual—and you’ll never know whether they’re interested if you don’t ask.

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My own kids are too young to take hunting at this time, but I still bring them along when I’m scouting for sign or checking trail cameras. They enjoy the time spent with Dad and are gaining an understanding of the connection between the outdoors and the food on their plates.

Can’t find a kid in your area to mentor? You can become a digital mentor through an app called “Powderhook.” The app allows new hunters to ask questions and gain insight through anonymous interactions with more-experienced mentors. In just a few minutes per week, you can help guide the next generation. Continue reading 10 Things You Can Do to Ensure the Future of Hunting