Category Archives: Hunting Heritage

For hunters, it’s time to play offense

The anti-hunting movement has overwhelmed the consciousness of the hunting industry. Hunters, hunting land, firearms, and the sporting way of life are under attack politically and socially. Millions of hunt-able acres are shut down in Oregon to protect the spotted owl. Lead ammunition is banned in California. Increasingly legislators, not biologists, are making wildlife management decisions. Professional huntress Melissa Bachman receives threatening messages to this day, over a year removed from the day she posted her now-famous lion photo. A deceptive foe, the Humane Society of the United States, seems to gain momentum even in the face of science, ethics and reason. The negativity and pressure has taken its toll, leaving industry leaders frustrated and searching for answers. A way of life once mandatory to sustain life is now fighting for its own life.

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According to John Frampton, industry veteran and leader of the Council to Advance Hunting and Shooting Sports, “we’ve got to do something drastic or hunting as we know it won’t exist for future generations.”

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Top 5 Things to do with Your Antlers

Top 5 things to do with your antlers

5. Decorate.  Whether they’re the yearling set of spike sheds your daughter found while spring turkey hunting last year or the trophy 10 point your grandpa killed in the 50’s, antlers are always a great conversation piece.  Hung on the wall or arraigned on a shelf, they’re sure to spark the curiosity of your guests.

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Hunt of a Lifetime

Powderhook team member Marty Hogan made his way up to Alaska for a once-in-a-lifetime hunt. Here is his story:

Last fall, my dad invited me on a trip he was planning. This was not just any trip, but an Alaskan moose, black bear and grizzly hunt. Naturally, my reaction was HELL YEAH! We flew to Anchorage and then took a floatplane to Rainy Pass Lodge, smack dab in the middle of nowhere. We had hundreds of miles of untouched wilderness all to ourselves.

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(Right after we got off off the float plane)

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OUTDOOR PLEDGE UNITES OUTDOORSMEN

Powderhook, a free website that connects people with places to hunt and fish, announced today an initiative to promote a common code of ethics to outdoorsmen.

The Outdoor Pledge puts into simple terms the wisdom of generations of sportsmen, mindful of the reality that for many people time spent outdoors with their teachers is scarce. Through this initiative, Powderhook seeks to unite the individuals and groups that care about the true meaning of what hunting and fishing is all about: being a steward of the land, promoting goodwill through strong ethics, honoring the beauty and fragility of nature, and teaching the next generation to do the same.

Powderhook hopes to identify opportunities to work with people and organizations on a technology-backed approach to growing ethical outdoorsmen and women. “Our hope is that we can help reinvigorate the national conversation about doing things right and for the right reasons,” said Eric Dinger, founder and CEO of Powderhook. “Hunting and fishing shows have done a great job of creating interest in the outdoors, but most people will never shoot a buck or catch a trout as big as they see on television. It’s important we share with people the true meaning and purpose of time spent outdoors.”

The “Outdoor Pledge” harkens the work of one of the greatest American Conservationists, Teddy Roosevelt. The 26th President spoke often of the need to protect our natural resources – the bountiful land, water, and wildlife for which strong stewardship is the only answer to sustainability. “People have a very strong connection to the places and animals they hunt and fish, but today these same resources face new challenges. It’s important to bring fresh eyes and new ideas to the fight,” said Dinger. Through partnering with leading outdoor conservation and manufacturing organizations, Powderhook plans to do just that.

Although this initiative is in its infancy, the response from the outdoor community has been quite positive. Any individual, brand, business or organization can take the pledge by visiting OutdoorPledge.org.

For more information on Powderhook, please visit Powderhook.com/about or contact us at info@powderhook.com or 855-4SPRTSMN.