Category Archives: Hunting Heritage

McKean Minute: When Mentoring, Any Amount Will Do

We talked a couple weeks ago that one of the main attributes of being a mentor is simply showing up, being available to someone who has questions and needs guidance.

The second great attribute is to give that guidance in any amount. Many of us get intimidated by the idea that in order to be a good teacher, we need to give all of ourselves. While some of us have a bottomless reservoir of outreach, most of us simply don’t have the time, energy, or enthusiasm to answer every question that comes around or to be available around the clock. Continue reading McKean Minute: When Mentoring, Any Amount Will Do

Deer Don’t Vote

I’ll say it again. Deer don’t vote.

Through pieces like the those linked below, Sierra Club is attempting to pit consumptive recreational users against non-consumptive users in what can only turn into a race to the bottom for conservation. Surely the author realizes the villain in her story, Vista Outdoor, is one of the largest funders of conservation in this country, right? Nearly $88 million last year, in fact. You could add up the entirety of the financial contributions to conservation made by ThuleDAKINE, and every other company listed by the author, plus throw in hero brands like Patagonia and CLIF Bar and you wouldn’t get close to Vista’s level of contribution. That’s not a knock on any one of those companies… it’s just a fact. Continue reading Deer Don’t Vote

On Winning a SHIFT Award

On Friday night, Powderhook was awarded the 2017 SHIFT Award for Technology. It’s exciting to be recognized, and knowing what our team has gone through to deliver said technology, I think this award is something to be proud of.

SHIFT is a festival (conference) filled with conservation-minded thinkers and doers. While attending, I learned a lot, and I thought I’d use this opportunity to share some of the more prescient tidbits with you. Continue reading On Winning a SHIFT Award

Tackling SHIFT

I was the new guy… the one in the orange hat. For the first time in awhile, I knew almost no one walking into a conference the size of SHIFT.

SHIFT is an annual gathering of conservation-minded leaders from around the country. They gather in Jackson, Wyoming each year to tackle tough issues. In ways I’ve never been part of before in the outdoor industry, they work to build bridges across political and ideological lines – though it helps that the topic of this year’s SHIFT was Preserving our Public Lands, an issue that unites nearly every conservationist.

There are around 350 people here, and on the surface, you could draw the conclusion that many are “anti-hunting” or at a minimum, “hunting agnostic.” But, time and time again we’ve had great conversations about the role hunting plays in conservation. We’ve discussed what it really means to be a hunter, we’ve spoken about the threats a declining hunting population poses to the source of many of their budgets. I’ve explained the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation at least a dozen times to people who make their living in conservation. Almost every conservation has been concluded with positive takeaways.

Representatives from Sitka, First Lite, Patagonia, and REI are pictured here on the same stage talking about conservation advocacy from a brand perspective. Despite being very different, the need to protect public lands unites these brands. SHIFT leadership seems to have gone out of their way all week to introduce hunting, talk about hunting, feature hunting, and show the hunting community they’re welcome.

There is very little camo here, and perhaps because of that, some really cool things happened. Here are some examples. Continue reading Tackling SHIFT

An Open Letter to Hunters

Fellow Hunters,

It’s never been more clear that now is the time to act. The hunter numbers are in, and they’re not good.  Preliminary findings of U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation indicate a 5-year fall-off of over 2 million hunters. Since 1980, hunter numbers have fallen from nearly 18 million to the current count of 10.5 million. The preliminary findings are summarized well here. The future of conservation in this country relies heavily on our collective ability to reverse a devastating trend in hunter participation.

But what can we do about it? Continue reading An Open Letter to Hunters

Powderhook Events API Now Available

 

Powderhook PRO users can now implement the Powderhook Event API, a first of its kind, nationwide, outdoor event dataset.

R3 (recruitment, retention, and reactivation) has become a hot topic in the outdoor industry. And while events play a significant role in the adoption sequence, it’s not often that outdoor events are visible in places new people think to look. According to Powderhook CEO, Eric Dinger, the Events API is a step toward solving this problem. “Fundraising banquets, family fishing nights, and countless other types of events are great ways to recruit, retain, and reactivate hunters, anglers, and recreational shooters. But in order for events to reach their potential as an R3 tool, we have to get outdoor events into the mix of other things people can do with their time. Through this API the outdoor industry is now able to list their events alongside things like concerts, plays, sports tournaments, and other options. And, because of its open architecture, any brand, fish and wildlife agency, or organization can begin promoting all the events in their area, rather than just their own.”

In total, over 9,000 hunting, shooting, fishing, and conservation events are accessible via the API. Event hosts include major NGOs, such as Ducks Unlimited and National Wild Turkey Federation, state agencies, and businesses. New events are added every day via integrations with our partners, scrapers, and APIs. Once the API is implemented, no additional development time or support resources are required to keep it up-to-date.

There are many uses for the Powderhook API:

Web developers can implement a calendar containing events from hundreds of sources.

State agencies can map all the events happening in their state as part of their R3 effort.

Businesses can create a calendar of events happening near their location(s).

Non-government organizations can aid their members in finding other things to do in their local area.

More information is available here: https://powderhook.com/events-landing

To view the events on our map simply navigate to: https://www.powderhook.com/map

Next up we’ll announce a fully self-contained calendar widget, giving our partners the ease of configuring/copying/pasting our events calendar into their website.

Please email us with questions.

Jesse Mudd Is A Powderhook Local Legend

Our newest Local Legend is a Marine Veteran and the president and Founder of his non-profit organization Veterans4Veterans Outdoor Adventures Inc. out of Beloit, KS. His name is Jesse Mudd.

Jesse decided to start his organization because of an unfortunate event which happened to his friend while serving in Afghanistan resulting in the loss of an arm and both legs. Combining his passion for the outdoors and his drive to help Veterans, Jesse went beyond just helping his friend, helping any Veteran that wants to de-stress, decompress, and get back into the outdoors.

Vets4Vets is dedicated to the physical and emotional rehabilitation of disabled active military service personnel and Veterans through hunting, fishing, and outdoor adventures. They also pair youth with Veterans who take them hunting and fishing allowing them to develop a mentor-mentee relationship which is crucial in developing new lifetime hunters and anglers.

Jesse is a great man, husband, and father to 3 children. He works a full-time job but never fails to dedicate most of his free time to this organization. Because he has such a big heart and loves helping kids and Veterans heal through the outdoors, Jesse, doesn’t expect a single thing in return even though he does almost everything himself.

The term local legend means different things to different people. But, a constant is a local legend knows or does something meaningful in their local area. A legend in a difference context harkens a guide or map. Jesse should be celebrated for his work moving North-Central Kansas toward a more hopeful future – a roadmap that likely includes more than a few hunting and fishing licenses sold to new hunters.

The technology company will accept nominations and recognize individuals and organizations for doing the critical work of helping their friends and neighbors find their way outdoors.

According Powderhook CEO, Eric Dinger, the program fits the way Powderhook looks at the challenges facing sportsmen and women of generations to come. Said Dinger, “Hunting and fishing license sales generate much of the revenue needed to support conservation work. It’s been well documented license buyers are declining as a percentage of the US population. At Powderhook, we fundamentally believe the only way that will change is to engage people at the local level in affecting this trend in their own lives. No program, no marketing campaign, no app, or website can do what the readers of this story can do by stepping up and getting involved. It’s up to us as individual sportsmen and women to do the work, and that’s why we’re excited to begin recognizing the people that are doing so. A very simple way to think about it is ‘do more people go because of me, or do less people go because of me?’ If everyone could answer ‘more,’ like the people we’ll honor through Local Legends, the trend would change.”

If someone in your area is doing what it takes to be called a Local Legend, shoot Powderhook an email at legends@powderhook.com. Please include some contact info, along with a photo, and a few sentences on why you believe your nominee deserves recognition for their work.

How to Improve Your Turkey Game This Season

Spring is the time of year we turkey hunting fanatics look forward to most. We make sure we have our tags in hand long before opening day, we practice our calls so we can sound like the reigning Grand National Champion, and we might even do a bit of preseason scouting.

But in preparing for our favorite day of the year, there are some things we often forget to consider. Here are a few tips that will help make your turkey season more successful, or at least more enjoyable.

To continue reading visit: http://www.nwtf.org/hunt/article/improve-turkey-game

Don’t forget to download the NWTF Gobble Map. It’ll help you with the good local info you need to plan your next hunt.

Donald Trump Jr. on Hunting

By now you’ve probably heard that Donald Trump Jr. enjoys hunting and fishing. But, to hear him speak so eloquently of our traditions, of our way of life, is a thing to behold. This video is an excerpt of his keynote at the 2016 Western Hunting and Conservation Expo.

Said Trump Jr., “I know the benefits I got from being in the woods, in the duck blind, in the deer stand at 5 in the morning. It kept me out of so much trouble I would have gotten into in my life. I want to make sure that lifestyle, those great American traditions, are there for my kids.”

No matter who you voted for, Trump Jr.’s message hits home for the sportsman. Let’s hope his influence can be felt in policy decisions throughout our government in years to come.

Donald Trump Jr. at the 2016 Western Hunting & Conservation Expo from Sportsmen for Trump on Vimeo.

Video: Sportsmen for Trump via Vimeo

The Question That Will Save Hunting

It’s been well documented hunting license buyers are declining as a percentage of the US population. Beginning around age 65, license sales begin to plummet drastically, as hunters begin to have physical, financial, geographic, or other limitations. While the overall decline in total licenses sold has been very slow, the largest cohort of hunters, the Baby Boomers, are nearing the proverbial license buying “cliff.” Alarmingly, the cohort of Millennials who must replace them appears to be significantly smaller. Analyzing the data in the video below can lead one to some grim conclusions for our North American Model of Wildlife Conservation.

Video and Data Credit: Dr. Loren Chase, Arizona Game and Fish

 

Hundreds of entities including businesses, organizations, and agencies, as well as individuals in positions of leadership in the hunting industry have turned their focus to this very real threat. But can their concerted efforts do enough, fast enough?  No one knows, but what we do know is our industry needs the help of the individual sportsman and woman.

The one sure way we can change is to engage people at the local level in affecting this trend in their own lives. No single program, no marketing campaign, no app, or website can do what the readers of this story can do by stepping up and getting involved. It’s up to us as individual sportsmen and women to do the work.

So, here’s the big question: Do more people hunt because of you, or do fewer people hunt because of you? If everyone you hunt with, and everyone they hunt with could answer “more,” we will secure our collective hunting heritage long into the future.

Let’s start asking.