Improvise, Adapt & Overcome

By Clint Lindemann – www.safe-shoot.com

Bio:

I was born and raised on a farm in North Dakota. When I was 15 years old I was in a hunting accident that left me paralyzed. I am a C4-5 quadriplegic. I graduated from North Dakota State University in 2002. Started hunting again when I was 19. I have a crossbow mount and a rifle/shotgun mount that can be attached to my electric wheelchair. I also fish with an electric reel that can be mounted to my chair. I am president of my local wildlife club, active in summer baseball program and write as much as possible about my activities. Hoping some of my ideas can help others get out and enjoy the outdoors.

Blog:

Sad to say, in every hunting season, in every state there are always hunting accidents that involve shooting of another in a hunting party. I know this all too well, I am one of the statistics. On December 28, 1994 my life would change forever after my own hunting accident.

During Christmas break of that year we had wrestling practice once a day, usually in the mornings and after that a couple buddies and I would go trudging through the snow looking for deer with our bows.  Northeast of my hometown in the “Hartford Valley” there was always a big group of deer that wintered there.  We would spend hours pushing deer back and forth but no one ever got a real good shot at any deer. Continue reading Improvise, Adapt & Overcome

POLITICAL ACTION ALERT: PR Modernization

Occasionally there comes along federal legislation we feel it’s important for sportsmen to know about. The Pittman-Robertson Modernization Act, now in committee in both the House and Senate, represents one of those times. Please take a moment to write your elected officials in support. You are welcome to use this letter as a template, or just as a helpful starting point for your own letter.

Remember to change the words in bold and parenthesis – (BOLD). 

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I’m writing today to ask for some help with a bill I think is very important to the people of (YOUR STATE).

Census data will be released in the next few weeks that indicates hunting license sales are down by over 16% nationally since the same survey was taken only five years ago.

In my opinion, hunting and other outdoor recreational pursuits are the lifeblood of tourism in (YOUR STATE). As you know, many small towns rely on the influx of hunters and the money they bring with them each year. Our business is one of hundreds based in the state that benefit when hunter numbers to grow, and suffer when they shrink.

There is a bill, S. 1613 , in the Environment and Public Works Committee, that would change what can be done with funds earned by Fish and Wildlife Agencies through what’s called The Pittman-Robertson Act. The funds are earned through an 11% excise tax placed on hunting-related gear, and they’re distributed back to the states to fund the activities of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and related NGOs. Pittman-Robertson money cannot be used to promote hunting, and we need to change that.

I would like to ask Senator (YOUR SENATOR’s NAME) to consider sponsoring this legislation. You are welcome to use this letter as that ask, or I’d be happy to meet with in (YOUR STATE), or at a time that makes sense in DC, to discuss it.

Here’s what I like about this bill: No congressional mandate. No new money. Fish and Wildlife Agencies still control the money. And, it aligns Pittman-Robertson funding with its sister legislation The Dingell-Johnson Act, which taxes fishing-related gear. (YOUR STATE FISH AND WILDLIFE AGENCY), and all other recipients need to “play offense” to grow hunting, and this bill is a step toward helping them do that.

Here’s what I don’t like as much about this bill: Besides Fish and Wildlife Agencies or NGOs, no entity can do the work of conserving wild places for wild animals. Hunters need wild places, and non-hunters need wild places, so it’s important the money intended for wild places is used to sustain what we have and create more. However, the hunter funds this model, and without more hunters, the “habitat” money will dry up – ultimately leading me to write this letter.

Thank you for considering, and please let me know if it makes sense to meet.

Major Powderhook Update

Powderhook Launches Major App Update

LINCOLN, NE  Local, current information on hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting is now easier than ever to find with the newest Powderhook update. The Nebraska-based tech company has assembled nearly 10,000 outdoor events from many major NGO’s, retailers, state agencies and more and organized them in a new feature called “Discover.”

Here’s a breakdown of everything you’ll find in the newest release. As always, visit the App Store or Google Play to download or update the app.

Discover: Easily find an event or public hunting spot near you.

Events
When people are out looking for stuff to do on the weekends, outdoor events usually aren’t on anyone’s radar. Why is that? People who host outdoor events are competing for attendees just like a movie theater, concert venue, sporting event or pretty much anything that a person can do to entertain themselves. This update and the API Powderhook has created for others to use changes that.

When it comes to creating new participants, it’s hard to know which event might trip which trigger. With the Powderhook update, we’ve not only begun to distribute our partner’s events to the top five event hosting websites on the internet, we compile them in a sortable feed for our users to access.

Public Spots
People are constantly looking for a new or better spot to go. Powderhook has always had one of the most complete public lands map available for free to anyone who downloads, but now we give users a cleaner ability to sort and configure search results. “I was headed up to Ohio last weekend and used the app to find a spot to go,” says app user Bobby Bostian. “It was great being able to hit the ‘Directions’ button and have it take me right to the spot. I also showed a couple hunters the ‘Discover’ section of the app and they were absolutely amazed at all of the public land that was available in their area.”

Leaderboards: Find out who’s doing the work of passing along our heritage in your state.

Whenever a user in the app answers a question, makes a post, replies to a comment, or becomes a Digital Mentor they earn what we call “CRED”. The more a person uses the app and provides useful information, the more they can build their “CRED,” one day earning them incentives. People can now see how they stack up to other users in their state to provide a fun, competitive aspect to helping others have a better day outdoors.